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Saturday, February 20, 2010

TRESE: The Last Full Show


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pngd_lPVzVE

Many thanks for Dan and Dang of IDEALS Creatives for inviting me to be part of last year's Pecha Kucha.

In Pecha Kucha "
each presenter is allowed 20 images, each shown for 20 seconds each giving 6 minutes 40 seconds of fame before the next presenter is up."

So, I decided to do make my presentation a tour of Trese's Manila, which became a 6 minute 40 second Trese short story.

Doing this event was a dream come true. One of my favorite scenes in the move CAPOTE was the part where he read the opening chapter of his book to jam-packed theater. It amazed me at how people were willing to spend a night watching a man standing in front of a podium and slowly read his tale to them. No special effects. No grand soundtrack. Just the man, his story, and the sound of his voice. Watching that scene, I wondered when I would get the chance to do the same thing.

It was wonderful to be given the chance to do just that. So, thanks again to Dan, our super-host Jao Bautista, and the team who put together Pecha Kucha Manila.


Watch the rest of the talks at
http://www.youtube.com/user/pechakuchamanila

Pecha Kucha Night Manila Vol. 2 - Budjette Tan, writer and co-creator of "TRESE" graphic novel, December 9, 2009, Cineplex 3, Shangri-La Plaza Mall, EDSA

Organized by Ideals Creatives (http://ideals.ph)

Visit: http://pechakuchamanila.com/main/
Follow: http://twitter.com/pechakucha_MNL
Email: pknmanila[at]gmail.com

ABOUT PECHA KUCHA
Pecha Kucha Night, devised by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham (Klein Dytham architecture), was conceived in 2003 as a place for young designers to meet, network, and show their work in public.

But as we all know, give a mike to a designer and you'll be trapped for hours. The key to Pecha Kucha Night is its patented system for avoiding this fate. Each presenter is allowed 20 images, each shown for 20 seconds each giving 6 minutes 40 seconds of fame before the next presenter is up. This keeps presentations concise, the interest level up, and gives more people the chance to show.

Pecha Kucha (which is Japanese for the sound of conversation) has tapped into a demand for a forum in which creative work can be easily and informally shown, without having to rent a gallery or chat up a magazine editor. This is a demand that seems to be global as Pecha Kucha Night, without any pushing, has spread virally to over 200 cities across the world.